Monthly Archives: October 2013

Sorry for the light posting

I’ve been focusing on finishing my job market paper, which reassesses the equity and efficiency consequences of corporate taxation. I’ll occasionally post things over the next two weeks but it will be light until mid-November.

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Who Pays for Public Employee Health Costs?

From Jeff Clemens and David Cutler: We analyze the incidence of public-employee health benefits. Because these benefits are negotiated through the political process, relevant labor market institutions deviate significantly from the competitive, private-sector benchmark. Empirically, we find that roughly 15 percent … Continue reading

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On Property Taxes in New York

From an interesting NYTimes article on different plans to tax those with high incomes in New York: The idea that nonresidents should pay little or no tax has long rested both on notions of fairness, since they’re not around much … Continue reading

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Consumption and Cash-Flow Taxes in an International Setting

From Alan Auerbach and Michael Devereux: We model the effects of consumption-type taxes which differ according to the base and location of the tax. Our model incorporates a multinational producing and selling in two countries with three sources of rent, each … Continue reading

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CEA’s New Weekly Economic Index

Originally posted on Donald Marron:
The Council of Economic Advisers just released an interesting paper examining the macroeconomic harm from the government shutdown and debt limit brinksmanship. To do so, they created a Weekly Economic Index from data that are…

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Technological Change through History: the View from 30,000 feet

Brad Delong has a an outstanding post on technological change. He categorizes how people add value and shows how technological change alters these categories. It’s interesting to think about his post and these issues in terms of a simple (classical) model and … Continue reading

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Yes, Economics Is a Science

From Raj Chetty: THERE’S an old lament about my profession: if you ask three economists a question, you’ll get three different answers. This saying came to mind last week, when the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science was awarded to … Continue reading

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