Tag Archives: Wages

Bargaining and the Gender Wage Gap: A Direct Assessment

From David Card, Ana Rute Cardoso, and Pat Kline: An influential recent literature argues that women are less likely to initiate bar- gaining with their employers and are (often) less effective negotiators than men. We use longitudinal wage data from Portugal, matched … Continue reading

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Corporate Taxes and Union Wages in the United States

From Alison Felix and Jim Hines: This paper evaluates the effect of U.S. state corporate income taxes on union wages. American workers who belong to unions are paid more than their non-union counterparts, and this difference is greater in low-tax … Continue reading

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Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany

From Clemens Fuest, Andreas Peichl, and  Sebastian Siegloch: Because of endogeneity problems very few studies have been able to identify the incidence of corporate taxes on wages. We circumvent these problems by using an 11-year panel of data on 11,441 German … Continue reading

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Untangling Trade and Technology: Evidence from Local Labor Markets

A new paper from David Autor, David Dorn and Gorfon Hanson. ABSTRACT: We juxtapose the effects of trade and technology on employment in U.S. local labor markets between 1990 and 2007. Labor markets whose initial industry composition exposes them to rising … Continue reading

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Regional Variation in Health Insurance Premia, Wages, & Health Costs

While I’m certainly not the first to point these features out, it is astounding to look at how quickly health insurance premia have grown overtime, especially when you compare this growth to that of average wages, total Medicare spending per … Continue reading

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Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor: The United States in Historical Perspective

A new working paper from Larry Katz & Robert Margo This paper examines shifts over time in the relative demand for skilled labor in the United States. Although de-skilling in the conventional sense did occur overall in nineteenth century manufacturing, … Continue reading

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Who Benefits from the EITC?

Given the discussion on minimum wages and other low-income programs, I thought I’d highlight a study by Jesse Rothstein that roughly argues that the EITC encourages more people to work, which bids wages down for low income workers and enables … Continue reading

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