Tag Archives: Incidence

Who Benefits when the Government Pays More? Pass-Through in the Medicare Advantage Program

From Mark Duggan, Amanda Starc, Boris Vabson: Governments contract with private firms to provide a wide range of services. While a large body of previous work has estimated the effects of that contracting, surprisingly little has investigated how those effects vary … Continue reading

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Who benefits from state corporate tax cuts?

Here is a new VOXEU summary of my job market paper for their job market paper series: State and local governments have been increasing business location incentives and cutting corporate taxes to attract businesses to their jurisdictions. For instance, Jay Inslee, the … Continue reading

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Who Pays for Public Employee Health Costs?

From Jeff Clemens and David Cutler: We analyze the incidence of public-employee health benefits. Because these benefits are negotiated through the political process, relevant labor market institutions deviate significantly from the competitive, private-sector benchmark. Empirically, we find that roughly 15 percent … Continue reading

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Technological Change through History: the View from 30,000 feet

Brad Delong has a an outstanding post on technological change. He categorizes how people add value and shows how technological change alters these categories. It’s interesting to think about his post and these issues in terms of a simple (classical) model and … Continue reading

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Who Benefits from Technological Change?

Given recent concern about technological change and how it is wrecking the middle class, I thought I’d share a simple illustration of what classical economic models* imply about the relationship between productivity growth and the returns to workers and capital owners. … Continue reading

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Six Reasons to Study Capital Taxation

Here are four reasons from Emmanuel Saez: Capital income is about 25% of national income (labor income is 75%) but distribution of capital income is much more unequal than labor income. Capital income inequality is due to differences in savings behavior but also … Continue reading

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Apple, Avoidance, and Corporate Tax Incidence

In all the discussion over Apple today, remember that if labor bears the corporate tax, then companies avoiding it may actually end up helping workers. In other words, if workers end up picking up the tab (because capital is mobile/companies … Continue reading

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Do Higher Corporate Taxes Reduce Wages? Micro Evidence from Germany

From Clemens Fuest, Andreas Peichl, and  Sebastian Siegloch: Because of endogeneity problems very few studies have been able to identify the incidence of corporate taxes on wages. We circumvent these problems by using an 11-year panel of data on 11,441 German … Continue reading

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Who Benefits from the EITC?

Given the discussion on minimum wages and other low-income programs, I thought I’d highlight a study by Jesse Rothstein that roughly argues that the EITC encourages more people to work, which bids wages down for low income workers and enables … Continue reading

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